Backyard Geology: The Valles Caldera

There’s still some geology left for me this semester – this coming Monday I get to start cutting my thin section from the kimberlite I picked up at Green Mountain. Eventually the thin section will be made in to a slide and I’ll be doing a petrographic analysis, taking a photo micrograph of it, and ...

ESLI

This week, I come bearing a link: The Earth Science Literacy Initiative I hadn’t actually heard of this before. My mom got a copy of their flier when she was on a tour, and then handed it off to me. It is one densely packed little folded piece of paper. One thing I did notice ...

Backyard Geology: Capulin Volcano

Four days in a row of hiking (since even though we came back on Sunday, we did another hike on Monday) have just about destroyed me. I’m limping around like an old lady today. Lots of very, very cool stuff was seen on the field trip. Yes, I took many pictures. No, I haven’t uploaded ...

Sinkholes and Giant Rats

Okay, they’re not actually related. Just a couple of nifty links for today – I got something of a late start this morning because the cat that I’m cat-sitting had a pee accident. The result was a lot of frantic squirting of Nature’s Miracle and me getting out of the house close to an hour ...

Backyard Geology: The Green Mountain Kimberlite

Unfortunately, I can’t provide very good directions to this one, and there’s a good reason for it. We drove up to Green Mountain (near Boulder, Colorado), got on one of the trails, and then at a random time just sort of bombed off into the underbrush. It involved going down and back up an extremely ...

Backyard Geology: Recent Volcanism in Colorado (part I)

Well, school has started; expect to see a lot of backyard geology posts for the next month, since I’m in an igneous and metamorphic field geology class. We’ll be going to some very cool places! Sites first, then a bit of background: Valmont Dike is a very striking feature in Boulder. The best place to ...

As always, humans are less patient than geology.

Clash Over Rebirth of Mt. St. Helens Basically, there are getting to be louder and louder disagreements over the Forest Service management of the study area at Mt. St. Helens. It’s been almost thirty years since the eruption. No doubt most people are ready to move on, but not those pesky scientists. I really do ...

Friday Link-O-Rama!

Water triggers earthquakes – An interesting look at the influence of water on fault deformation and volcano formation at a plate boundary. This of course immediately put me in mind of other situations in which fluids influence fault activity in my own backyard, Such as in Trinidad, Colorado recently, as well as the famous Rocky ...

Spiderbots!

From the Department of That Is Some Awesome Technology You’ve Got There: Scientists invent ’spiderbots’ that talk amongst themselves inside active volcano. I think this is some pretty exciting stuff, and I’m glad to see that NASA is working on it. Basically, they’re developing robots to form a self-healing network for sensing seismic data. The ...

Women at TAM (SGU interview)

There’s a lively discussion going on at Skepchick regarding women in skepticism. More precisely, women in skepticism as things went at TAM, which was discussed in this week’s Skeptic’s Guide to the Universe via interview. Here is the SGU forum thread about that episode, which contains a lot of discussion about the interview. I did ...