Links that I was going to post on Friday but forgot.

For scientists, moon rocks tell story of a young Earth And not a young earth in the way you might think – Earth when it was young, billions of years ago. This is some pretty interesting stuff on how the Moon might have formed, and certainly does explain the compositional similarities between the Earth and ...

The "birthers" as classic conspiracy theorists.

I’ve been hearing a lot about the “birthers” lately, and it’s kind of driving me nuts for a variety of reasons. If you’ve been living under a rock (yay, rocks!), “birthers” are people who believe that President Obama is not actually a natural-born citizen of the United States. They think he was born in Kenya, ...

Bacterial Bumps

Ancient Domes Reveal 3.45-billion-year-old Life History Stromatolites are very cool. They’re basically mounds of cyanobacteria (aka blue-green algae), built up over a long period of time like a microbial layer cake. They start out as a layer of happy little bacteria hanging out in warm, shallow water. The bacteria have wild parties and eventually build ...

Friday link-o-rama

Happy birthday, Apollo 11!(From yesterday.) Oh no! You’re over the hill now! We’d better wear black armbands for the birthday party. We can celebrate by watching these newly restored videos of the moon walk while we eat red velvet cake. Woo!Also: We Choose the Moon – relive the launch in real time! Dinosaur burrow in ...

Uniformitarianism is dead! Long live catastrophism!

I had something pop up in my google alerts this morning, and it pointed to this article on creation.com. I don’t recommend clicking or reading unless you want a helping of brain hurt this early in the day. The part that was of interest to me reads: By way of illustration, consider geologic formations in ...

Just when we thought the Texas Board of Education couldn’t get any scarier.

For about five minutes, I had a little flutter of hope in my heart when Don McElroy was given the boot from the Texas Board of Education. He was an infamous creationist stooge, and every time I heard his name, I cringed. While I’m not Texan myself, I’m well aware of the influence that Texas ...

Backyard Geology: Garnet/Magnetite sands from the Great Lakes

One of my coworkers (a geologist that I do a lot of work for), who shall for the purposes of this blog be called “Tim,” recently went home to Michigan to visit his family. He brought back a very cool little sand sample that he’d scooped up off the beach at Lake Huron. On the ...

A couple cool news stories.

Activity discovered at Yellowstone Supervolcano – I talked about supervolcanos a while back. Don’t worry, it’s still in no danger of blowing up any time soon. (And here, we’re talking geologically soon, which is a much, much longer span of time than a human soon.) The two cool things in this article are the discovery ...

Arkose & Alluvial Fans

Today was my second field trip with my Sed Strat class. We went up to Settlers’ Park to look at some exposed facies there. (A Facies is a group of sedimentary structures you see in a rock that points to a particular environment that the sediment was deposited in.) If you’re ever in the Boulder ...

Why you should love sedimentary rocks.

New year, new semester, new tax return, new FAFSA. Where does the time go? Mineralogy last semester ended well, though I can’t say I’m sorry to see it done. It takes a special kind of person to want to spend all your time staring into a petrographic microscope and thinking about 3-D crystalline forms. I ...